Nasal Spray or Oral Meds? What Treats Chronic Sinusitis Better?

sinusitus suffererSometimes, sinus infections just don’t seem to go away. If you deal with symptoms like fever, facial pain and nasal discharge for 12 weeks or more — and treatment hasn’t worked — then chronic sinusitis might be to blame.

So where do you turn, and what will actually do the trick? For sinus infections caused by a bacterial infection, antibiotics are an option. And Stanford University researchers have found that not all antibiotics are equal.

The Stanford team offered patients both inhaled (also known as nebulized) antibiotics and traditional pill forms. Turns out, 76 percent of patients on the inhalants noticed significant improvement and stayed symptom-free for 17 weeks, on average. (That’s compared to six weeks for those on oral meds.)

Why the difference? Researchers think that inhaled medications might have a one-up since they’re immediately closer to the problem areas: inflamed sinuses, which lie near the nasal passages.

But because antibiotics are just one type of treatment, you’ll want to talk to your doctor about which medicine is right for you. Other options can include:

  • Saline nasal spray, to rinse the nasal passages
  • Corticosteroids, medicines that fight inflammation and come in nasal-spray, pill or shot form
  • Decongestants, both over-the-counter (OTC) or prescribed
  • Pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen

In rare cases, surgery is sometimes recommended for patients who don’t respond to typical treatments, but that’s only a last resort.

From our own Dr. Robert Pincus:

“Whatever way the antibiotic is delivered, we at the sinus center believe it is essential to take a sinus culture so that we can treat with the most appropriate and least invasive therapy for each individual’s infection.”

Whatever type of treatment is right for you, we’re here to help you find sinusitis relief. Call our office for a personal consultation — we look forward to serving you.

Similar Posts: